Egypt Executes Seven Men in 48 Hours without Fair Trials: Report

An Egyptian human rights group on Friday said that Egypt has carried out executions on the seven death row convicts in the absence of fair trials.

The Egyptian Front for Human Rights (EFHR) in a statement said that evacuations occurred in the past 48 hours, and the defendants were also subjected to several violations after their arrest.

The (EFHR) in a statement condemned the execution against seven people, saying those executed defendants were subjected to several violations during the arrest, investigation or trial process, which did not affect the court’s decision to issue these sentences or the authorities implementing the executions.

On Tuesday, the prisons’ authority executed four men convicted in the case dubbed ‘The Helwan Microbus Cell’. In April 2021, a Cairo cassation court upheld a previous ruling, sentencing the four men to death for killing eight policemen in an ambush back in 2016.

“According to a lawyer of one of the four people who were executed, he confirmed to the Egyptian Front that he was subjected to severe physical torture during his enforced disappearance for more than a month after his client was arrested,” the EFHR said in a statement.

EFHR identified them as Abdullah Muhammad Shukri, Mahmoud Abdel-Tawab Morsi, Mahmoud Abdel-Hamid Ahmed Al-Junaidi, and Ahmed Salama Ashmawi.

Also, this week on Thursday, the authorities executed three other men. In 2019, a Cairo cassation court upheld earlier criminal court verdicts, ordering the execution of 13 men, 25 years in prison against 17, and different jail sentences against nine others.

“10 out 13 had already been executed in October 2020,” the statement added.

“It is worth noting that in this case, the defendants were also subjected to several violations after their arrests, such as enforced disappearance and physical and moral coercion to make confessions and the investigation in the absence of lawyers,” the statement added.


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