Spain’s Parliament Passes Bill That Legalizes Euthanasia

Spain’s lower house of parliament passed a bill on Dec. 17 that will legalize physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia to patients suffering from “a serious and incurable disease” or from a “debilitating and chronic condition.”

Spain’s lower house of parliament passed a bill on Dec. 17 that will legalize physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia to patients suffering from “a serious and incurable disease” or from a “debilitating and chronic condition.”

“As a society, we cannot remain impassive when faced with the intolerable pain that many people suffer,” Spanish Health Minister Salvador Illa told lawmakers.

Passed with 198-138 votes, the bill received support from the left-wing coalition government and from other parties. while the conservative Popular Party, far-right Vox Party, and religious groups opposed it.

“The euthanasia law is a defeat for civilization and a victory for the culture of death, for those who believe that some lives are more worthy than others,” Vox Party Leader Santiago Abascal said.

A small group of protesters also gathered outside the parliament in Madrid to express opposition of the bill.

If the Senate approves the bill, Spain would join Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Colombia, and Canada as countries where euthanasia is legal.

Furthermore, the bill will not go into effect until three months after the government gazette published it.

Patients suffering from “a serious and incurable disease” or a “debilitating and chronic condition” that they consider “unbearable” must ask to die four separate times during the euthanasia process, which a medical team led by a physician and another doctor as an external supervisor must oversee.

Also, the patient must be a Spanish citizen or resident of adult age and can make rational decisions.

The law also allows medical workers to deny participation based on their personal beliefs.


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