Mexican Congress Approves New Security Law that Strips Diplomatic Immunity from DEA Agents

The Mexican Congress approved on Tuesday afternoon a new national security law restricting the activities of foreign law enforcement officers, in a move that critics claim it will endanger intelligence sources and threaten the future of international anti-narcotics operations in the country.

The Mexican Congress approved on Tuesday afternoon a new national security law restricting the activities of foreign law enforcement officers, in a move that critics claim it will endanger intelligence sources and threaten the future of international anti-narcotics operations in the country.

Experts believe that while not ostensibly targeting officials from any specific nation, this new law would impact US agencies, including the Drug Enforcement Administration, which maintains a robust presence in Mexico.

“You’re going to see a situation where the efforts of US agencies, especially with the DEA, are significantly going to be diminished. They want to relegate the agencies like DEA to doing nothing more than staying in the office and just passing information,” the former DEA chief of international operations Mike Vigil told CNN’s Fernando del Rincon.

The national security law comes as relations between Mexico and the United States, increasingly close on security matters in recent decades, threaten to turn testy as a new US president takes office in January.


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