Indonesian Army Hunts Suspected Islamic Militants Over Christian Murders

The Indonesian army has deployed a special team on Dec. 1 to join the police in hunting 10 Islamic militants suspected to be behind the murder of four Christians in a remote village.

The Indonesian army has deployed a special team on Dec. 1 to join the police in hunting 10 Islamic militants suspected to be behind the murder of four Christians in a remote village last week.

According to the police, militants ambushed and killed four members of the Christian Church of Salvation Army, beheading one of them, last Nov. 27 in the remote Lemban Tongoa village in the Central Sulawesi province in the country with the biggest Muslim-majority in the world.

Police have suspected the attackers to be from East Indonesia Mujahideem, a group that linked to the Islamic State.

Police also said that the attackers burned down six houses and a church.

The Salvation Army released a statement last Nov. 28, calling for the government and the police to “uncover the perpetrators of this brutal attack, take appropriate action, and investigate and eradicate these criminal networks.”

A spokesperson from the Communion of Churches in Indonesia reportedly said that the attacks were acts of terrorism instead of a religious conflict.

The Washington-based human rights organization International Christian Concern have also called the attacks “terrorist.”

Central Sulawesi has seen violent attacks between Christians and Muslims over the years.


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