China Tariff’s Australian Wine up to 212%

China announced that it will impose temporary anti-dumping measures on wine imported from Australia from November 28 that will impose taxes up to 212%.

China announced that it will impose temporary anti-dumping measures on wine imported from Australia from November 28 that will impose taxes up to 212%.

Importers suspected of bringing in Australian wine to be sold below cost price in order to gain market share will be required to pay deposits to China’s customs authority.

Australian trade minister Simon Birmingham said that the tariffs will double or triple the wine prices and make it unviable or unattractive to exporters.

Beijing has defended that some Australian wine is being sold cheaper there than in its home market through the use of subsidies which Australia denied.

“Australia defends to the hilt our winemakers, their integrity, and the commercial market-based proposition and environment in which they operate. The idea that Australia somehow subsidizes our wine industry for it to be able to dump or sell its product below cost on international markets is a falsehood,” said Birmingham. 

China is currently Australia’s biggest wine export market which gets about 37% of Australian wine exports, worth more than $800m.

Treasury Wine Estates (TWE), one of the world’s biggest winemakers based in Australia saw its share price drop more than 13%.

Australia’s agriculture minister David Littleproud said that the government was “extremely disappointed” with China’s decision/


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