Mexican Government Won’t Allow Officials Accused of Corruption to be Tried in the US

The Mexican government will no longer allow officials accused of corruption to be tried in the United States, representing a move that could end a decades-old tradition in which most of the high-profile drug-trafficking and corruption cases of Mexico have been tried in the neighbor country.

The Mexican government will no longer allow officials accused of corruption to be tried in the United States, representing a move that could end a decades-old tradition in which most of the high-profile drug-trafficking and corruption cases of Mexico have been tried in the neighbor country.

On Friday morning, Mexico’s Foreign Relations Secretary Marcelo Ebrard announced the government’s decision, two days after the United States dropped a drug-trafficking and money laundering case against the country’s former defense secretary Salvador Cienfuegos.

“Whoever is culpable according to our laws will be tried, judged and if applicable sentenced in Mexico, and not in other countries, and that is the basis which has been encouraged with this agreement. That is what has been discussed, what has been agreed and what has been maintained with U.S. authorities,” Ebrard told local reporters during a press conference.

Cienfuegos was returned to Mexico Wednesday and was promptly released. Ebrard vowed that the investigation into Cienfuegos would be “worthy of Mexico’s prestige and dignity.”


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